The real cost of enlightenment

How to help if you have family or friends in RSE.
lindak31
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon May 27, 2013 11:05 am

The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by lindak31 » Mon May 27, 2013 11:08 am

Throughout my childhood coinciding with my father attendance at RSE, I have been inundated with doomsday stories of the world ending, the earth tilting, gray men controlling the world, aliens controlling our governments, sea levels rising and wiping out most of the population, etc etc ..... I was surprised dad’s been sucked in again as JZ Knight recycles her old ideas in the latest round of fear mongering and is hoarding food and fuel for the next “ end of the world”

Overall, as a result of being a diligent RSE student over the last 20 years , my father has really only been ever interested in himself. He was rarely there physically or emotionally for my brother and I after he started paying for his enlightenment in our early teens. Selling the family farm, he starting nipping off to Yelm for long periods - financially deserting his overworked wife, who slaved 12 hour night shifts to send me to boarding school where I could escape my unsettling home life. The more my dad visited Yelm, the more out of touch he became with normal society, and found it difficult to relate to those around him and form meaningful or satisfying relationships - a double edged sword.

The problem is, he is so deeply invested in this cult that after so long (20 years ) theres no going back for him. T here is no way he would be able to give it up now without feeling like a complete idiot and having to confront he’s been royally shafted by that charlatan Ms Knight and Co (tm) . It would almost be impossible for him to digest the pain he has caused us and the cash he has wasted... So I watch him in his seventies, struggling with his health ( which he cant fix through C&E) , struggling to have anything in common with anyone , and being divorced from his family and really just having a joyless life.......really so sad....and all that for what ?

The real cost of enlightenment is not the huge fees a RSE student pays.. It’s the destruction of their family fabric.

Rooster
Posts: 392
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:30 pm

Re: The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by Rooster » Mon May 27, 2013 8:28 pm

Welcome Linda,
I do understand what you are going through. My Mom and Dad are still in the school. I have no hope of them ever waking up from rse. I think it would be too much, for them as well. There health is really declining. All the money, time, hoarding of junk, and time wasted. They have missed out on much family time and there own grandchildren. They had a vacation from Yelm, I think 10 years ago. I can not get them to leave for another. Something bad is always lurking around the corner. I feel your pain. I am happy you are here with us.

Cedar
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2013 10:39 am

Re: The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by Cedar » Mon May 27, 2013 8:30 pm

I feel for you lindsk31... RSE ruins peoples personalities such that they cannot relate to others in a healthy way. I personally watched RSE totally destroy the personality of a relative. As well, I notice a correlation between being close to JZ... On staff etc, and having such personality characteristics deeply engrained. Perhaps those characteristics are why JZ chose them, one theory I've heard.

Regardless, I'm glad you found this site, and can educate yourself about the brainwashing and poison of RSE. Hope your mother finds EMF as well. Sounds like she has had quite a struggle as well.

Ockham
Posts: 799
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2011 6:15 am

Re: The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by Ockham » Tue May 28, 2013 1:31 am

Welcome Linda.

Thanks for your posting. You're right on. Being trapped in RSE becomes self-sustaining; it is much simpler for the cult-addicted ramster to continue the RSE belief system than to face the potential for ridicule and heavy emotional toll for exiting. One of the best things we outsiders can do is to remain non judgmental and to try to stay in communication (to the extent our ramsters will allow). I agree that loss of time is heaviest cost imposed on ramsters by RSE. No amount of physical wealth or desire can restore lost time.

The RSE belief system of manifesting may become insidious as ramsters age and experience increasing need for routine health care. Simple issues that could be easily mitigated with doctor visits could go unaddressed. Belief in manifesting means even contemplating a medical condition gives substance to that condition. For example, a ramster doesn't dare go to the doctor for a cancer screening, lest that recognition result in manifesting, and hence the misguided thinking that the ramster must actually want to have cancer. We have seen a number of friends and family personal recollections here on EMF of ramsters who died untimely of what might have been treatable or at least manageable health conditions.

Add the financial depletion caused by RSE training to the RSE belief system and it sums up to a rough old age for all but the handful of ramsters who were already extraordinarily wealthy before they ever set foot in RSE.

Marie
Posts: 174
Joined: Thu Jan 24, 2008 7:55 pm

Re: The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by Marie » Tue May 28, 2013 5:15 am

Linda, I'm in the same boat, having lost more than one family member to r$e. Mine have been involved from anywhere to 25 years -- my sister -- to 13 years -- my mother -- to 5 or more years, other family members. I also have no hope, and really no desire, at this point, for them to wake up. I don't feel as Okham does, that one must maintain an attitude of love and compassion and remain connected to them as much as they will allow. What they have put me and my son through, is beyond any compassion I can muster for them. Truly, I no longer care.
"That's me in the corner -- losing my religion" -- REM

joe sz
Posts: 1010
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2008 2:43 am
Location: Birdsboro, PA
Contact:

Re: The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by joe sz » Tue May 28, 2013 5:58 am

Marie and all,
a rule of thumb is to remain neutral with members of family or friends in a cult IF you expect them to turn to you when they feel in doubt somedasy, or IF you intend to attempt an intervention. This 'neutrality' is actually a form of hypocrisy fro most people. At some point, the hypocratic mask might have to come off, thus risking a complete breakdown in relationship. Many of the families i have worked with opt for taking off the mask after many years of tiresome 'making nice.' Sometimes the raw honest yet respectful truth about how you feel can have positive outcomes for all but do not bet on it.

There is no good way to handle these relationships. Anyone that is devoted to and deluded by RSE puts those on the outside that love them in a no-win situation. And that might be what is at the core of JZ's devilish game.

I have been around elderly channeling cult members and Theosophists who tended to be isolated from the cult they were in simply because they have become infirm and old or terminal. As with any cult that requires you to "Work" your way to ascension or heaven, to perfect health, and to 'remarkable' success, failure to do so is always laid at your feet---blame the victim for creating that karma---and cult members will avoid the dying, aging member like the plague--unless of course that member has a lot of money to leave behind!

I have been around some of these aged cult folks on their deathbeds with their pictures of Saint Germaine, quotes from Ramtha, or an image of Nicholas Roerich or some other bogus guru in direct view till the end.

Sad and pathetic :sad: I could only wonder what is on the other side for them, but I could see what a waste of a legacy they left behind.

Ockham
Posts: 799
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2011 6:15 am

Re: The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by Ockham » Tue May 28, 2013 11:25 am

What Joe points out is a big deal for the cult addicted. As the cult members age, their declining health may be seen by the other cult members as failure at mastering the cult belief system. The ailing cult member is likely to be shunned by other cult members who fear the possibility of negative energy being somehow contagious. Additionally, the ailing adult member himself or herself has to deal with the internal guilt of not being able to master the cult belief system and in the case of RSE, the idea that failing health is somehow a willful manifestation.

As Joe pointed out, some cult members won't ever let go of cult beliefs even to the last breath. I personally have not yet had to deal with declining health of people I know in RSE. I understand that it can be difficult not to feel resentment after years of isolation. I focus my blame on RSE rather than the cult addict. I don't think I'd go out of my way to intervene, but I'm willing to be available if help is needed. I am also pragmatic about it - I am not about to drop everything and move to Yelm to render bedside assistance. I expect compassion and its acceptance to be somewhat of a two way street.

Rooster
Posts: 392
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:30 pm

Re: The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by Rooster » Tue May 28, 2013 5:14 pm

What I see is the older in general seem to have there own groups. Others are very old friends that always seem to have a bond. Some do shun the elderly and declining health. With the live streams many do not ever attend rse. They do live with the constant guilt, not getting it. They will not give up knowing it may not be this lifetime, but the next. They never fail to strive for two hundred years. This is my parents anyway.
My parents have been in so long, I see no hope. Not just because of the it would be too much to accept. I see the techniques of brain washing, as I will call it Joe. The long term effects on the mind, seem to cause a deep deterioration. Almost a state in which this is now the reality they are stuck in. I do not know just how to explain it. I am sure I can think of better words for it. The brain seems damaged by it. Any insight on this joe?

joe sz
Posts: 1010
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2008 2:43 am
Location: Birdsboro, PA
Contact:

Re: The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by joe sz » Tue May 28, 2013 10:33 pm

when we interact with the elderly brought to our psych hospital, we are taught to engage them about their past. It works like a charm to get them talking and affords me time to get a handle on how they are functioning at the moment. Older folk engage memories to reclaim what is slipping away. The present is not always a comfort as the future no longer holds a promise of renewal---the end is near and the past contains evidence of who they are or have become.
I would get an aging RSE or cult member to talk about a pre-cult life, even about those early days of when they first got interested in the cult if you want to have a conversation. The present will get you mired in their troubles.

Rooster
Posts: 392
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:30 pm

Re: The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by Rooster » Wed May 29, 2013 3:06 am

Thank you Joe,
That really makes sense. The best conversation, I had with my mother was about her past. Have trouble with my father. He is a broken record of government conspiracies. I am thinking some is more than old age. At times it is like the mind is somehow fragmented, yet stuck in the past. The past of the cult that is. Maybe it is just lack of critical thinking gone wild.

joe sz
Posts: 1010
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2008 2:43 am
Location: Birdsboro, PA
Contact:

Re: The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by joe sz » Wed May 29, 2013 7:13 pm

brains age differently. neuro-palsies and dementia can hit as early as the 50s with some people, so it is hard to say what is cult and what is brain disease after middle age. One elegant lady I knew well was sharp into her 100th year, then she lost it and could ony speak in Italian, her first language until age 8. She died that year...I was a pall bearer.

Early dementia can exhibit obsessions that have somehow got fixed in the brain's neuro-circuits or nets. I have an uncle with late stage dementia in a nursing home..his main activity is to fold and hoard napkins for past 2 years as he mutters to himself in Hungarian only.

Elizabeth
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue May 21, 2013 5:38 pm

Re: The real cost of enlightenment

Unread post by Elizabeth » Thu May 30, 2013 2:39 pm

I have noticed a similar thing with the old-timers at the ranch that I have seen with older University students. Instead of just taking a new piece of information in and digesting it, older 'students' of all types try to fit it in with what they already know--since dropping what they already know seems too discontinuous/spontaneous of a process. Once we already have a piece of information that has been worth retaining, it seems illogical to just let go of it.

The result is either a rich tapestry of information woven together when the information is all relevant and continuous (e.g. a carpenter returning to college to study architecture), or some mish-mash of contradictory information strung together by an imaginative line of pseudo-reasoning (e.g. a ramster from the 80's trying to figure out which aliens will eat you, which are allied with the secret government conspiracies, and which ones will whisk you away from this deteriorating planet and take you to your rightful place in the 23rd universe).

In both cases, the younger 'students' are the quicker ones, are more adaptive to the information and can take it in the context it is in. But the older ones often struggle to place it in with the other info they have. It's a valuable struggle when you're combining political science with the current events you've lived through. But what kind of chaos it causes on a day to day level when RSE students have been told what opinion to have on EVERYTHING and it always changes. Cell-phones? Cars with electronic ignition? Mixing wine with C&E? Twilight for 24 hours or get up at 3am and do a 'walk'? Let the knowledge of trees guide you to immortality, but cut all the trees on your land down because solar flares will catch them on fire? Behold god in yourself, but worship my words, actions, dress and opinions above your own?

Post Reply

Return to “Family Members, Friends, Educators and the Cult Experience”